The Morphii science labs are humming these days.  After learning that morphiis seem to be more fun and more helpful than emojis or simple descriptive words for reporting emotional reactions to brand-related social media images in a recent study conducted by one of our development partners, we got a bit ambitious.  

We’ve undertaken a project to help clarify which primary emotions, if any, a few dozen of the most popular anthropomorphic emojis represent to U.S. users.  In doing so, we’re the first to specifically categorize and quantify the specific types and intensities of core emotions perceived in those emoji.  This work is illuminating in an unprecedented way which emojis enjoy the highest and lowest agreement within the five most popular operating system platforms, and which ones are most easily misinterpreted from one platform to another. This is critically important as, unlike morphiis, emojis can appear very differently when sent from, say, an Android phone to an Apple device, and even from one Android device maker to another.

Among various practical and valuable proprietary insights flowing from these studies, these studies also help us to refine our own internal study mechanisms to research our Morphii Platform UI/UX, and to validate our morphiis against alternative measures.  This helps us to speed development and to increase both the utility and “stickiness” of our platform, particularly as we gather speed with several clients in the healthcare space, including Atlanta-based Clearwave, Inc. and Continuous Precision Medicine (CPM), based in Raleigh, NC.

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